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The Guardian
Sunday March 26, 2017 @ 01:11:19 AM mt

Get Out: the horror film that shows it's scary to be a black man in America



The first trailer for Jordan Peeles directorial debut about a murderous white community is a refreshing vision in a genre that often sidelines people of color

Just in time for Halloween and after a notably devastating year for race relations in the US, the first trailer for Jordan Peeles directorial debut Get Out has hit, causing an understandable stir. Given Peeles Emmy-winning Comedy Central show Key & Peele, its perhaps no surprise that his first film as director would involve racial commentary (one of his most famous skits revolves around the fear a black man has walking through a white neighborhood), but whats interesting is that he would insert this within the horror genre.

Related: Bad omens: Blair Witch and the trouble with the horror franchise revival

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The Guardian
Sunday March 26, 2017 @ 01:11:08 AM mt

First trailer launched for new Pixar film Coco



Animated love letter to Mexico follows a young boy as he travels to the mythical Land of the Dead after finding an enchanted guitar

Pixar has unveiled the first trailer for its newest animated film, Coco.

Described by director Lee Unkrich (Up, Toy Story 3) as a love-letter to Mexico Coco follows Miguel, a young boy captivated by the musicianship of dead guitar player Ernesto de la Cruz. When he breaks into Ernestos mausoleum and touches his enchanted guitar, Miguel finds himself whisked off into the Land of the Dead and a journey into his family history. Gael Garcia Bernal and Benjamin Bratt are among those providing the voice work.

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The Guardian
Sunday March 26, 2017 @ 01:11:07 AM mt

Project Polunin: backstage at the blazing dancer's new show in pictures



Photographer Sarah Lee was granted unique access to the preparations for Sergei Polunins new triple bill, an ambitious collaboration with Ilan Eshkeri and David LaChapelle featuring Natalia Osipova

Project Polunin is a new initiative spearheaded by the maverick Ukrainian dancer Sergei Polunin in order to collaborate with contemporary artists, musicians and choreographers. At Sadlers Wells in London this week he is presenting a triple bill of modern and classical pieces comprising the UK premiere of Vladimir Vasilievs Icarus; Tea or Coffee, choreographed by Andrey Kaydanovskiy; and the world premiere of Narcissus and Echo, co-created by Polunin, composer Ilan Eshkeri and the photographer and artist David LaChapelle.

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The Guardian
Sunday March 26, 2017 @ 01:11:06 AM mt

Stunning science: Wellcome Image Awards 2017 winners - in pictures



Established in 1997, the Wellcome Image Awards reward and showcase the best in science image making and this years 22 winning images represent a broad spectrum of techniques and specialisms

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The Guardian
Sunday March 26, 2017 @ 01:11:04 AM mt

How I see Britain: photographs that define the country



Former Guardian picture editor Eamonn McCabes TV series Britain in Focus has been charting the history of photography in the UK. Here, Irvine Welsh, Sadiq Khan, Jeanette Winterson, Nadav Kander and others pick the shots that sum up Britishness for them

A striking miner, Orgreave, 1984

Luke Wright, poet

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The Guardian
Sunday March 26, 2017 @ 01:10:57 AM mt

James Blunt: The Afterlove review likable isnt listenable



(Atlantic)

Ive been called a dick/ Ive been called so many things, sings go-to musical punchline James Blunt in the opening lines of his fifth album, on which he twice makes reference to his 2004 millstone megahit Youre Beautiful. Hes made a lot of capital recently out of this self-aware sense of humour, mainly via self-deprecating Twitter quips. But likable isnt listenable , and its hard to stomach the everyman shtick from an Old Harrovian multimillionaire with a ski lift named after him in the Swiss Alps, especially as he croons some people keeping all the cash on the perkily trite, why-cant-we-all-just-get-on strummer Someone Singing Along. That aside, a chart-friendly tropical dance-pop production boosts Ibiza resident Blunts querulous, tremulous balladry with a fresh Chris De Burgh-hits-Cafe Del Mar energy on Paradise, Bartender and California, but its bland business as usual on soppy numbers such as Make Me Better (co-written with Ed Sheeran) and Time of Our Lives.

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The Guardian
Sunday March 26, 2017 @ 01:10:57 AM mt

Roman Tragedies review Ivo van Hove's superb Shakespeare marathon



Barbican, London
Coriolanus, Julius Caesar and Antony and Cleopatra all together, in Dutch, fly by in Van Hoves extraordinary critique of the way we consume news

Ivo van Hove has, with his company, Toneelgroep Amsterdam, created an extraordinary six-hour marathon, Roman Tragedies, first staged in the UK in 2009. I was nervous about its length and the hours of angry Dutch ahead (with subtitles) and the loss of Shakespeares words. Not only that, but this was not to be faithfully translated Shakespeare but a looser text, inspired by Coriolanus, Julius Caesar and Antony and Cleopatra.

But as soon as I walked into the Barbican theatre and saw Jan Versweyvelds set, I could see we were in for an adventure. Ahead is what looks like a conference centre or departure lounge (and there will be many violent departures between 4pm and 10pm). Its filled with potted palms, sofas and multiple screens and there is no mistaking the buzz: this production turns Shakespearean tragedy into news.

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The Guardian
Sunday March 26, 2017 @ 01:10:56 AM mt

Thundercat review adventurous ace of bass



Gorilla, Manchester
The gifted bassist and Kendrick Lamar sidekick twists fusion, soul and hip-hop into magical shapes

Contrary to the lamentations of Ryan Goslings Sebastian in La La Land, jazz is enjoying a surprising moment in the sun. Few would have predicted that the most acclaimed albums of the past two years would be partnerships with forward-thinking jazz musicians. On last years Blackstar, the versatility and dynamism of Donny McCaslins band enabled David Bowie to make one last leap into the unknown. On Kendrick Lamars To Pimp a Butterfly before that, jazz was a means of connecting hip-hop to the ferment of the 1970s. Lamars chief lieutenant was Stephen Bruner, the Los Angeles bass player who calls himself Thundercat.

Bruner is the son of Motown session drummer Ronald Bruner Sr and the brother of Ronald Bruner Jr, who has played drums for Prince and Stevie Wonder. He joined the veteran thrash metal band Suicidal Tendencies as a teenager, moving on to session work for the likes of Erykah Badu and Flying Lotus. His undulating solo albums blend jazz fusion, soul, hip-hop and yacht-rock with an eccentric sense of humour and a hazy sense of loss. Drunk, his latest, features Lamar and Wiz Khalifa as well as Michael McDonald and Kenny Loggins: an index of both his breadth and his clout. The album pushes his melancholy falsetto to the fore while his bass functions as the bubbling river that carries the songs along. His live shows are something else entirely. The river bursts its banks and runs wild.

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The Guardian
Sunday March 26, 2017 @ 01:10:56 AM mt

The Autopsy of Jane Doe review bone-crunching horror



A father and son coroner team find they have more on their hands than they bargained for

Have you ever wondered what sound rib-cutters make as they crunch into the chest cavity of a corpse? Or the groan of a bone saw as it chops through the skull to reach the brain? Ponder no more, thanks to this enthusiastically gory horror from Andr vredal (who made his name with the terrific Troll Hunter). Its hard to think of another film that has brought such lip-smacking relish to its sound design. A superior cast (Brian Cox and Emile Hirsch play a father and son coroner team) adds to the fun, as does the production design the pair work in a dimly lit basement painted the colour of clogged arteries. But the chaotic payoff cant match the effectively torturous build of tension in the first two acts.

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The Guardian
Sunday March 26, 2017 @ 01:10:55 AM mt

Life review exuberantly grisly Alien rip-off



Rebecca Ferguson, Jake Gyllenhaal and Ryan Reynolds play an enjoyably gory game of hide-and-seek with a hungry alien

The crew of a space station is picked off, one by one, by an extraterrestrial life form which seems to view the human contents of the craft as some kind of alien finger buffet. And if that premise sounds more than a little familiar, thats because Daniel Espinosas enjoyable sci-fi horror movie shares narrative DNA with everything from Tarkovskys Solaris to Danny Boyles Sunshine to, most glaringly of all, Ridley Scotts Alien. But although this is undeniably an Alien rip-off, its an Alien rip-off that announces itself with a dizzyingly audacious zero-gravity single-shot sequence in which Ryan Reynolds wrests a wounded satellite out of orbit using a rob otic grabber claw. With this stunning set piece, cinematographer Seamus McGarvey more than meets the challenge set by Emmanuel Lubezkis Oscar-winning work on Gravity.

The satellite contains Martian soil samples, within which is an inert single-celled organism: incontrovertible proof of life on Mars. In the name of scientific research (or of narrative convenience) the head researcher (British actor Ariyon Bakare) decides to jump-start the organism out of its stasis, and is rewarded by a rapidly growing glob of gelatinous malice. Aliens infamous John Hurt chest-eruption scene is matched for gruesome relish if not shock value by a sequence in which the creature force-feeds itself to a key character. Not all of the actors have enough screen time to really register, but Jake Gyllenhaal, playing a jaded medic who no longer feels he belongs on Earth, has a brooding, soulful quality; the electricity between his character and Rebecca Fergusons safety officer crackles satisfyingly.

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