Found: 2229 records....
The Guardian
Saturday April 29, 2017 @ 05:11:40 PM mt

Doctor Who recap: series 36 episode three Thin Ice



A Victorian frost fair on the frozen Thames, coupled with a menacing giant snake, made this one of the most visually stunning episodes ever

Can you be nostalgic for something that once made you nostalgic in the past? This is time travel, so quite possibly. But to explain, this series is all about starting everything afresh, and so Bills first trip into the past has the same echoes of newness as Rose and her similar trip in 2005s The Unquiet Dead. And that was when the only response to the return of Doctor Who was nostalgia, because the whole thing was so improbable. Certainly not something that would be the BBCs biggest property 12 years later. Time can be a funny thing.

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The Guardian
Saturday April 29, 2017 @ 05:11:39 PM mt

My mum the punk pioneer: Poly Styrenes daughter remembers the X-Ray Spex leader



Six years since her death, the punk singer remains hugely influential. Her daughter reflects on learning the family business, how fame nearly broke her mother and why shes making a film of her life

Even when I was really young, I knew what my mum did for a living. She was always working on something: writing music, recording, doing interviews. As I got older, shed tell me about the punk movement, about the musicians she knew and what it was all about.

We lived with my grandmother on and off through that period, and she saw punk very differently. For my grandmother being a punk meant things like wearing odd-coloured socks, which she didnt approve of. Even Mum didnt like a lot about punk, too. There was loads she found exciting, of course, but shed tell me plenty of the negative stuff: the aggressiveness of the crowds, the spitting on stage, how very few women were present at many of these gigs and how that made her terribly anxious about performing. I realised later she was trying to warn me off becoming any kind of performer, in case I got any ideas.

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The Guardian
Saturday April 29, 2017 @ 05:11:38 PM mt

When good TV goes bad: how Battlestar Galactica became a holy mess



It was season three, when its quasi-religious leanings went into overdrive, that did for the 21st-century version of the cult sci-fi drama

Sci-fi in the 1970s was rambunctiously silly. Star Wars gave us space warriors with furry dog-faced alien sidekicks, while Doctor Who centred on a jelly-baby-munching time traveller with a penchant for scarves the length of The Great Wall of China. Less well remembered, but no less nutty, was 1978s Battlestar Galactica, in which the last remnants of humanity flee through space from the evil Cylons, a race of shiny space-robot villains who all have voices like T-Pain.

The show lasted just two seasons before space-pilots Starbuck and Apollo were pensioned off to a retirement home for Luke Skywalker lookalikes. For decades, hardcore acolytes petitioned for a revival and few expected much when the Ronald D Moore-led reboot finally arrived in 2003. How to update a show whose worst excesses included a furry robot dog played by an actual chimp for a generation coping with the grim reality of George W Bushs war on terror?

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The Guardian
Saturday April 29, 2017 @ 05:11:38 PM mt

Guerrilla's John Ridley: 'As Three Kings went through the system George Clooney was unblackified'



The Oscar-winning writer of 12 Years a Slave on race in Hollywood, his must-suffer TV and his spat with Steve McQueen

Did John Ridley know what he was letting himself in for? When we meet the morning after the London premiere of his political drama Guerrilla, the busiest man in television still seems to be processing last nights audience reaction to his UK debut. I dont know if surprised is the word, he says, pensively. I think, unfortunately, sometimes these kinds of stories are both timely and timeless.

Amid the usual post-screening feting and fact-checking, several attendees asked about his decision to feature an Asian woman, played by Mumbai-born Freida Pinto, at the forefront of a film about Britains 1970s Black Power movement (the series also features Wunmi Mosaku and Zawe Ashton, albeit in less prominent roles). A heated discussion about the erasure of black women ensued, which has also spilled out on social media.

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The Guardian
Saturday April 29, 2017 @ 05:11:37 PM mt

Original Observer photography: April 2017



Artist Chris Ofili, musicians Thurston Moore and Beth Ditto and boxer Anthony Joshua all feature in this months showcase of the best photography commissioned by the Observer

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The Guardian
Saturday April 29, 2017 @ 05:11:36 PM mt

The chic and the shabby: Paris in the 1950s by Marilyn Stafford



US photojournalist Marilyn Stafford worked for fashion houses, and documented the lives of slum children and refugees fleeing Algerias war of independence

A new exhibition at Lucy Bell Gallery in St Leonards-on-Sea shines a light on her work

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The Guardian
Saturday April 29, 2017 @ 05:11:35 PM mt

The people of Harlem as painted by Alice Neel in pictures



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The Guardian
Saturday April 29, 2017 @ 05:11:13 PM mt

When Light Is Like Water by Molly McCloskey review lust and delusion



The tale of an idle transgression turns into a profound meditation on love in this ferociously well-written novel

Adultery is often sentimentalised in fiction, but in her ferociously well written second novel Molly McCloskey gives it to us straight. Alice is a twentysomething American who fetches up in Ireland at the tail end of the 1980s, just before the economic boom of the next decade. She works in a Sligo bar, where her foreignness causes a bit of a stir. McCloskey slyly captures the provincialism of those pre-Celtic Tiger years, when the men Alice meets are both knowing and a little slow and yet disarmingly innocent. One of these men is a suburban furniture salesman called Eddie (rhymes with steady), whom she falls in love with for his reassuring imperturbability. They marry, buy a house overlooking Ben Bulben the books physical world is finely realised and settle down. Alices mother, left behind in the States, approves. I thought I was on the threshold of my life, says Alice.

Related: Circles Around the Sun by Molly McCloskey - review

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The Guardian
Saturday April 29, 2017 @ 05:11:13 PM mt

Unreported World: Obesity in Paradise review fighting fat on Samoa



Having rejected local food in favour of processed western junk, nine out of 10 people on Samoa are overweight. Sophie Morgan uncovers a quiet epidemic

I cant say I wasnt warned. The film does contain some medical procedures, said Krishnan Guru-Murthy, introducing Unreported World: Obesity in Paradise (Channel 4).

Even so, I found it shocking. At the diabetic foot clinic in Samoa, 41-year-old Annie is having flesh scraped away with a scalpel from a seeping open wound on the underside of her swollen foot. Shes not in pain she cant feel the foot, and the flesh around the wound has started to die. No anaesthetic required. In fact shes asleep. As well as the type 2 diabetes, another side effect of Annies obesity is sleep apnea.

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The Guardian
Saturday April 29, 2017 @ 05:11:12 PM mt

Balancing Acts by Nicholas Hytner review secrets of the National Theatre



The NTs former artistic director digs up absorbing material, and argues that high-minded can also be showbiz gold

Impressive though his time running the National Theatre was, in one respect Nicholas Hytner still has something to prove: the matter of memoirs. In 1983, his predecessor Peter Hall published his rambunctious and gossipy Diaries, a Tamburlaine-like epic in which Hall locks horns with hostile unions, pettifogging bureaucrats, a restive press and (not least) his own sizeable ego. After Hall came Richard Eyre, whose 2003 book National Servicegrapples with the awesome responsibilities of being artistic director of Britains biggest theatre. Eyre is more thoughtful and introspective than Hall Hamlet instead of Tamburlaine but equally incisive in his account of this oddest of theatrical jobs, in which one is required not just to make drama but be a politician, artistic figurehead and part-time courtier.

Related: Nicholas Hytner: Ive always thought of theatre as a cure for loneliness

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